The Mid-Autumn Festival, The Moon Fairy and Mooncakes

Here at Kiddiwinkie Schoolhouse, we inspire curiosity through activities we conduct. One of which is by celebrating festivals observed by countries across the globe.

We believe that our children learn best from experiencing events and these experiences will be valuable ones that stay with them for life.

These are some of the activities we conduct at Kiddiwinkie Schoolhouse so our children learn more about the Mid-Autumn legends, observances, crafts – and of course the yummy mooncakes!

How are children at Kiddiwinkie engaged?

As Mid-Autumn Festival is also the Moon Festival, its legends are usually related to the moon. In the classroom, our teachers conduct a variety of interactive and fun activities to engage our children.

These activities are age-appropriate, allowing children of different age groups to learn best. Activities such as story-telling, sing-along, lantern-making and mooncake tasting are some of the things we do to let our children immerse themselves in Chinese culture the fun way!

Here are some ideas and tips of activities parents can also conduct at home:

  1. Story-telling – Introduce the Mid-Autumn Festival legend. (Recommended free material here and for the following age groups:
    1. 18 months old – 2.5 years’ old: “Thanking the Moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival” by Grace Lin, “Round is a Mooncake: A Book of Shapes” by Rosanne Thong)
      round-is-a-mooncakethanking-the-moon
    2. 5 years’ old to 3.5 years’ old: “Mooncakes” by Loretta Seto
    3. 4 years’ old: “Mooncakes” by Loretta Seto
      loretta-seto-mooncakes
    4. 6 years’ old: “Lin Yi’s Lantern” by Brenda Williams
      lin-yi-lantern
  2. Continent Study – How children where Asia is located on the globe or world map.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of Chinese characters by writing their names on paper mooncakes in Chinese
  4. Talk about mooncakes and show photos of different types of mooncakes.
  5. Create mooncakes out of Playdough

Secret Message in Mooncake

It is believed that once long ago the Chinese used to send secret messages that were baked inside the mooncakes to one another. Read the book, “Thanking the Moon: Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Moon Festival,” by Grace Lin. After reading the story children will make their own mooncakes and write their name on the top in Chinese and draw a special message inside their mooncake. Compare the messages inside fortune cookies to mooncakes. After participating in the activity, children will enjoy snacking on fortune cookies and reading their fortune.

Materials:

  • 2 Brown construction paper circles for each child
  • 1 piece of white typing paper per child
  • Black paint
  • Crayons
  • Brad
  • Black marker
  • Paint brushes

How to Make:

  1. Child will practice writing the symbol of their name on the white paper with a paint brush and black paint. (Akin to Chinese calligraphy).
  2. Provide child with a large white circle and 2 brown circles.
  3. Child will think of a message they would like to relay to parents, siblings or friends and draw a picture of it on the white circle using crayons, and write their Chinese name on the brown circle with the black marker. (If they do not have a Chinese name, they can use a tool here)
  4. Parent will place a brown circle on the top and bottom of the white circle with a brad. Child can exchange their “mooncakes” and try to guess one another’s secret messages.

In addition to these wonderful activities and crafts children will enjoy making a paper lantern. Decorate with tinfoil and glitter; place a glowstick inside so they will glow. Make traditional mooncakes and learn about the different phases of the moon.

Alternative names from other Asian countries

Tet Thrung Thu  or Children’s Festival – In Vietnam, because of the emphasis on the celebration of children.

Harvest Moon Festival – because of the occasion’s association with the full moon on this night

Mooncake Festival – because of the popular observance of eating mooncakes on this occasion.

Lantern Festival (Singapore and Malaysia) – not to be confused with China’s Lantern Festival which falls on 15th of the first month of the Chinese calendar.

LIKE OUR IDEAS?

Feel free to drop us a message to requests for more tips on activities you can conduct at home with your child.

If you are a parent looking for a premium preschool and would like to find out more about Kiddiwinkie’s approach, do send us an email at enquiry@kiddiwinkie.com.sg or call us at 6875 0444.

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